Promises, Promises

Via Lambert:

Here’s the transcript:

I happen to be a proponent of a single payer universal health care program.” (applause) “I see no reason why the United States of America, the wealthiest country in the history of the world, spending 14 percent of its Gross National Product on health care cannot provide basic health insurance to everybody. And that’s what Jim is talking about when he says everybody in, nobody out. A single payer health care plan, a universal health care plan. And that’s what I’d like to see. But as all of you know, we may not get there immediately. Because first we have to take back the White House, we have to take back the Senate, and we have to take back the House.” (emphasis added)

Well gee, we already took back the White House, the Senate and the House. What’s the hold up?

So-Where-s-My-Fucking-Pony

Wait! Obama promised to computerize our medical records, and the big bucks medical insurers are gonna kinda-sorta-maybe-notta hold down cost increases. We’re saved! Avedon Carol:

Obama, as far as I can tell, is just in it for the kabuki – pretend to give Americans a better healthcare option, but don’t actually do it. (Sort of like withdrawing from Iraq without actually doing it, closing Gitmo without actually doing it, forbidding torture without actually doing, etc.)

Arthur Silber:

It’s what I expected, because Obama lies. He lies all the time, on every matter of consequence. It’s what he does.

(Cue the Obots Failbots whinging “McCain would have been worse!)

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For a peek at how those poor Canadians suffer through with Marxist medicine, check out Debunking Canadian Health Care Myths by Rhonda Hackett:

Because if the only way we compared the two systems was with statistics, there is a clear victor. It is becoming increasingly more difficult to dispute the fact that Canada spends less money on health care to get better outcomes.

[…]

In actuality, taxes are nearly equal on both sides of the border. Overall, Canada’s taxes are slightly higher than those in the U.S. However, Canadians are afforded many benefits for their tax dollars, even beyond health care (e.g., tax credits, family allowance, cheaper higher education), so the end result is a wash. At the end of the day, the average after-tax income of Canadian workers is equal to about 82 percent of their gross pay. In the U.S., that average is 81.9 percent.

[…]

Ten percent of Canada’s GDP is spent on health care for 100 percent of the population. The U.S. spends 17 percent of its GDP but 15 percent of its population has no coverage whatsoever and millions of others have inadequate coverage.

Poor commie bastards. Aren’t we the lucky ones?  Better dead than red.

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